Scientists to determine if white whale carcass on Victorian beach is well-known Migaloo

Read Time:1 Minute, 18 Second

The Guardian

Wildlife scientists are working to establish if a white whale carcass that washed up on a Victorian beach is that of well-known albino humpback Migaloo.

The albino carcass was found at a Mallacoota beach in the state’s East Gippsland region and was only accessible by water.

The White Whale Research Centre was expected to make an announcement on Sunday.

“We are currently getting more photos and videos to help us better understand more about this individual,” Macquarie University wildlife scientist Dr Vanessa Pirotta wrote on social media.

“This animal could have passed some time ago and been weathering. This may have caused the skin to come off. Alternatively, this could be another white whale.”

The famous white humpback was first sighted in 1991 off Byron Bay, when he was believed to be between three and five years old.

He was dubbed Migaloo, an Indigenous word for white person.

It has been two years since the albino whale was last spotted after losing his tracking chip.

Pirotta told the ABC she was keen to establish if the carcass was Migaloo.

“The first thing we think of when we hear of a white whale is the world’s most famous white whale, Migaloo,” she said.

“Having seen photos, this very much does appear to be in fact a white whale, but whether it is Migaloo, we are yet to know.”

It was unclear how long the carcass has been there.

July 17, 2022 at 05:06AM Australian Associated Press

Happy
Happy
0 %
Sad
Sad
0 %
Excited
Excited
0 %
Sleepy
Sleepy
0 %
Angry
Angry
0 %
Surprise
Surprise
0 %

Average Rating

5 Star
0%
4 Star
0%
3 Star
0%
2 Star
0%
1 Star
0%

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

Previous post 5 Smart Comedy Specials From Veteran Standups
Next post Russia-Ukraine war at a glance: what we know on day 144 of the invasion